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BLACK INDIANS  ABOUT US  STAY INFORMED  

Bridging the past and future sharing stories of Black Indians and many more. "Who is afraid of Black Indians?"
http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=nePEBAWbyLM&u=/watch?v=aodq4s5metA&list=PLsXvBCk-wqdYV3W91eRHrjN-eIl5s5AJi&feature=share

Do not confuse Alone for Lonely

"I think it’s very healthy to spend time alone. You need to know how to be alone and not defined by another person." —Oscar Wilde 

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PROTECT OUR PANTHERS & ALL BIG CATS
:: LEARN FACTS ABOUT PANTHERS
»——-> http://ow.ly/gkvuL

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3 weeks ago
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Legendary #JimThorpe , with his sons Phil and Billy 1932

"Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope." —Maya Angelou

James Francis aka Jim Thorpe (Sac and Fox: Wa-Tho-Huk, translated as “Bright Path”) was a legendary American Indian athlete with caucasian ancestry. Considered one of the most versatile athletes of modern sports, he won Olympic gold medals for the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon, played American football (collegiate and professional), and also played professional baseball and basketball.

Of American Indian and European American ancestry, Thorpe grew up in the Sac and Fox nation in Oklahoma. He played as part of several All-American Indian teams throughout his career, and “barnstormed” as a professional basketball player with a team composed entirely of American Indians.

In a poll of sports fans conducted by ABC Sports, Thorpe was voted the Greatest Athlete of the Twentieth Century out of 15 other athletes including Muhammad Ali, Babe Ruth, Jesse Owens, Wayne Gretzky, Jack Nicklaus, and Michael Jordan.

Thorpe, whose parents were both half Caucasian, was raised as an American Indian. His accomplishments occurred during a period of heavy racial inequality in the United States. It has often been suggested that his medals were stripped because of his ethnicity. While it is difficult to prove this, the public comment at the time largely reflected this view. 

At the time Thorpe won his gold medals, not all Native Americans were recognized as U.S. citizens. (The U.S. government had wanted them to make concessions to adopt European-American ways to receive such recognition.) Citizenship was not granted to all American Indians until 1924.

While Thorpe attended Carlisle, students’ ethnicity was used for marketing purposes. A photograph of Thorpe and the 1911 football team emphasized racial differences among the competing athletes. The inscription on the most important game ball of that season reads, “1911, Indians 18, Harvard 15.” 

Additionally, the school and journalists often categorized sporting competitions as conflicts of Indians against whites; newspaper headings such as “Indians Scalp Army 27–6” or “Jim Thorpe on Rampage” made stereotypical journalistic play of the Indian background of Carlisle’s football team.

The first notice of Thorpe in the New York Times was headlined “Indian Thorpe in Olympiad; Redskin from Carlisle Will Strive for Place on American Team.”
His accomplishments were described in a similar racial context by other newspapers and sportswriters throughout his life.

In June 2010, Jack Thorpe filed a federal lawsuit against the borough of Jim Thorpe, seeking to have his father’s remains returned to his homeland and re-interred near other family members in Oklahoma. 

Citing the American Indian Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, Jack was arguing to bring his father’s remains to the reservation in Oklahoma, where they would be buried near those of his father, sisters and brother, a mile from the place he was born. He claimed that the agreement between his stepmother and Jim Thorpe, Pa., borough officials was made against the wishes of other family members who want him buried in Native American land. Jack Thorpe died at 73 on February 22, 2011.

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Check us out! African Native American

1 month ago
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Celebrating Jazzmin Renee White of Kiowa, Choctaw & African heritage

Beautiful young Jazzmin is the daughter of Jay and Shauna (Palmer) White. She is a descendant of the great Kiowa Warrior Goo-Lay-Ee and the Kiowa Black Leggins Warrior Society. 

Her Grandmother is famed Fancy War DanceGeorgette GeeGee Palmer

Her father’s side of the family (Black American) is from Virginia and North Carolina.

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1 month ago
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"If you’re walking down the right path and you’re willing to keep walking, eventually you’ll make progress." —Barack Obama 

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1 month ago
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We are all related! 

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1 month ago
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John Tortes “Chief” Meyers (July 29, 1880 - July 25, 1971) of the Cahuilla Nation, CA

John Tortes “Chief” Meyers was an American Indian Major League Baseball catcher for the New York Giants, Boston Braves, and Brooklyn Robins from 1909 to 1917. Meyers, a Cahuilla American Indian from California, was educated at Dartmouth College.

He played on the early Giants teams under manager John McGraw and was the primary catcher for Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson. Meyers hit over .300 for three straight years as the Giants won three straight National League pennants from 1911 to 1913. Overall, he played in four World Series – the 1911, 1912, and 1913 Series with the Giants, as well as the 1916 Series with the Robins.

The Cahuilla have been historically divided into “Mountain,” “Desert,” and “Pass” groups by anthropologists. Today there are nine Southern California reservations that are acknowledged homes to bands of Cahuilla people. These are located in Imperial, Riverside and San Diego counties and are the territory of federally recognized tribes.

Chief Meyers burial site is located at Green Acres Memorial Park & Mortuary, Bloomington, San Bernardino County, California, USA

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1 month ago
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#BridgingTheGap I DETERMINE WHO I AM -a personal story by Philippe from Africa for our weekly Bridging the Gap series on I Love Ancestry in partnership with 50 Shades of BLACK.

I’m Philippe from central Africa (Cameroon), and I have been living in London for ten years. I find the idea of 50 Shades of Black original, and I have been staring at the cover images for hours. The images brought back some questions I have tried to answer concerning the approach that some black people have of themselves and of the color of their skin. I have always believed that to complete my view on the matter, I shall travel and visit the United States, because so far my views are based on what I read and have seen on TV. I still struggle to understand the approach of black Americans when it comes to skin color, who they are, and their heritage.

I am black, living in a Western society, and I find myself lost about some attitudes of black people. I came to realize that even the term “black people” can’t be applied at a certain extent to all black people, especially if they don’t have the same history. Certainly, not to have experienced racism when growing up affects my perception of things. I have been called “n*gger” or “baboon” by people here, but I have not been offended because I have always thought that I should be the one determining who I am, not how some others might view me.

Having said that, I respect any other person’s attitude toward his skin color and the fact that they are black and have to defend it, proclaim it, or whatever it.

~Philippe
Chapter 6 page 85
Photo by Saddi Khali (Saddi Khali Photos Fan Page)
http://www.saddikhaliphoto/

PLEASE ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY http://www.50shadesofblack.com/shop 
—- 

BRIDGING THE GAP: Contemporary Realities, Our Ancestral Past, & Our Liberated Future

This is the 9th of our weekly series of posts curated by the creator of 50 Shades of BLACK in partnership with I Love Ancestry called BRIDGING THE GAP featuring contemporary stories of people like YOU from around the world.

Each week we will feature one of YOUR stories about your ancestors, your heritage, and/or your coming to understand/celebrate your OWN identity.

We personally invite you to join us on this journey of discovery and healing. Share your stories, find your voice, speak your truths.

Share YOUR Story: 
http://www.50shadesofblack.com/share-stories

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4 weeks ago
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"Nobody’s free until everybody’s free." ~Fannie Lou Hamer (October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977)

Celebrating Fannie Lou Hamer. Freedom Day in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Fannie Lou Hamer picketing for voting rights at the Forrest County courthouse, 1964

Fannie Lou was born in Montgomery County, Mississippi. In 1944 she met civil rights activists who encouraged Black Americans to register to vote. Shebecame active in helping. She also worked for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) which fought racial segregation and injustice in the South. So much much to say…

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1 month ago
2 notes

"First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then condemn you, then you win" -Gandhi

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1 month ago
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Harriet Tubman Day (March 10)! Remembering & Honoring an American Shero (1820 – March 10, 1913)

"Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world." —Harriet Tubman

"I had crossed the line. I was free; but there was no one to welcome me to the land of freedom. I was a stranger in a strange land." ~Harriet Tubman

Read More about Harriet….http://iloveancestry.com/ancestors/afro-black-african-americans/item/161-harriet-tubman-moses-abolitionist-american-hero-underground-railroad-union-spy

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1 month ago
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