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Bridging the past and future sharing stories of Black Indians and many more. "Who is afraid of Black Indians?"

Kathleen Cleaver and Natural Hair, #BlackIsBeautiful. Black Panther Party #BlackEdu

(Source: youtube.com)

23 hours ago
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Penny Gamble-Williams & IndiVisible: #AfricanNativeAmerican Lives in the Americas #BlackIndians

(Source: youtube.com)

2 days ago
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Chief Arvol Looking Horse on White Buffalo Calf Prophecy

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2 days ago
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Flathead Women, Western Montana ca. 1907 #Native #IndianCountry

"Diversity is a blessing, not a curse. Diversity is something that the Creator gave us. We have a responsibility to care for those unique values given to every culture." ~Tony Incashola, Flathead

The Flathead Indian Reservation, located in western Montana on the Flathead River, is home to the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai, and Pend d’Oreilles Tribes - also known as the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation. 

The reservation was created through the July 16, 1855, Treaty of Hellgate, and reservation has land on four of Montana’s counties: Lake, Sanders, Missoula, and Flathead.

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Photo by Edward H. Boos

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2 days ago
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#NinaSimone Talks #Blackness #BlackisBeautiful

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3 days ago
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Why is The Term #Redskins Harmful to many Native Peoples? #ChangetheName #ChangetheMascot @Redskins

To many American Indians, the term “Redsk*ns” is associated with the barbaric practice of scalping. The record in this case is replete with evidence of bounty proclamations issued by the colonies and companies. 

These proclamations demonstrate that the term “Redsk*ns” had its origins in the commodification of Indian skins and body parts; these “Redsk*ns” were required as proof of Indian kill in order for bounty hunters to receive payment and these skins of genitalia (to differentiate the skins of women and children from men, in order for bounty payers to pay on a sliding scale for the exact dead Indian) were referred to as scalps (while hair from the head was referred to as top-knots).

“In his desire to defend a name given to his team by an avowed segregationist, Dan Snyder can continue to try to attack me personally, but his strategy will not work because this is far bigger and more important than any one person or group,” Ray Halbritter said. “This is an issue that underscores what it means to treat people with respect and to stop causing them pain rather than continuing to insult them with a racist epithet.”

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3 days ago
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Hopi girls, Arizona. ca. 1900. #IndianCountry #Native #Hopi #HopiTribe 

"Remember who you really are, trust yourself, and open your eyes to the beauty of a new Earth unfolding before you as we breathe." —Hopi proverb

The Hopi People are a federally recognized tribe of American Indians, who primarily live on the 2,531.773 sq mi (6,557.26 km2) Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona. The Hopi Reservation is entirely surrounded by the much larger Navajo Reservation.

»>————— Idle No More —————«<

"Like a seed, your future is only beginning to emerge out of the darkness." —Hopi proverb

Photo by Frederick Monsen. Subscribe to I Love Ancestry eNews: http://eepurl.com/CLJan

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3 days ago
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STOP South Dakota’s ILLEGAL seizures of Lakota Children. Sign the petition NOW:http://www.lakotalaw.org/Action , Children are sacred Beings! 

Urge President Obama to stop Lakota children state kidnapping in South Dakota. The time has come to empower the Lakota Sioux tribes to have their own Child and Family Service Programs.

90% of Lakota foster children that don’t get placed with relatives will be placed in non-Native foster homes, in violation of the federal Indian Child Welfare Act.

Hearts on the Ground: South Dakota’s Forced Taking of Lakota Children, is a project of The Lakota People’s Law Project.

Stay informed about our work. Subscribe to I Love Ancestry eNews: http://eepurl.com/CLJan - Our strength lies in collective action. Join Us NOW!

Copyright 2014 Lakota People’s Law Projectta People’s Law Project

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23 hours ago
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Celebrating Gya Watson of African & San Carlos Apache heritage #Multiracial #Biracial #BlackIndians

“I am not a little bit of many things; but I am the sufficient representation of many things. I am not an incompletion of all these races; but I am a masterpiece of the prolific. I am an entirety, I am not a lack of anything; rather I am a whole of many things. God did not see it needful to make me generic. He thinks I am better than that.” —C. JoyBell C.

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2 days ago
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We Still Live Here: Black Indians of Wampanoag and African Heritage

(Source: youtube.com)

2 days ago
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Honoring Fredi Washington who crossed 20 years ago. December 23, 1903 – June 28, 1994 #BlackEdu #BlackHistory

"You see I’m a mighty proud gal and I can’t for the life of me, find any valid reason why anyone should lie about their origin or anything else for that matter. Frankly, I do not ascribe to the stupid theory of white supremacy and to try to hide the fact that I am a Negro for economic or any other reasons, if I do I would be agreeing to be a Negro makes me inferior and that I have swallowed whole hog all of the propaganda dished out by our fascist-minded white citizens.

I am an American citizen and by God, we all have inalienable rights and whenever and wherever those rights are tampered with, there is nothing left to do but fight…and I fight. How many people do you think there are in this country who do not have mixed blood, there’s very few if any, what makes us who we are are our culture and experience. No matter how white I look, on the inside I feel black. There are many whites who are mixed blood, but still go by white, why such a big deal if I go as Negro, because people can’t believe that I am proud to be a Negro and not white. To prove I don’t buy white superiority I chose to be a Negro.” —Fredi Washington (1903 – 1994)

This compelling story is the perfect example not to ascribe to the stupid theory of white supremacy. A real inspiration for many who are proud to be Black

Fredi Washington was an accomplished Black American dramatic film actress, one of the first to gain recognition for her work in film and on stage.

She was active during the period known as the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). She is best known for her role as Peola in the 1934 version of the film Imitation of Life, in which she plays a young mulatto woman.

Throughout her life, Washington was often asked if she ever wanted to “pass” for white. This was a question almost unique to United States society after the American Civil War and Reconstruction. 

It classified people by hypodescent, that is, mixed-race people were classified as belonging to the race of lower social status, in this case, Black, regardless of appearance and ancestry. Other multiracial countries tended to recognize a wider variety of classes. Washington answered conclusively, “no.”

"I don’t want to pass because I can’t stand insincerities and shams. I am just as much Negro as any of the others identified with the race." —Fredi Washington (Fay M. Jackson, The Pittsburgh Courier (1911-1950), Pittsburgh, Pa.: Apr 14, 1934)

"I have never tried to pass for white and never had any desire, I am proud of my race." In ‘Imitation of Life’, I was showing how a girl might feel under the circumstances but I am not showing how I felt." —Fredi Washington (The Chicago Defender (National edition) (1921-1967). Chicago, Ill.: Jan 19, 1935)

Washington was fearlessly outspoken about racism faced by Black Americans. She worked closely with Walter White, then president of the NAACP, to address pressing issues facing black people in America.

Her experiences in the film industry and theatre led her to become a civil rights activist. Together with Noble Sissle, W.C. Handy and Dick Campbell, in 1937 Washington was a founding member with Alan Corelli of the Negro Actors Guild of America (NAG) in New York.

She served as executive secretary, and worked for better opportunities for Black-American actors. She also was active with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and worked to secure better hotel accommodations for Black actors, who were often discriminated against while touring. She promoted less stereotyping and discrimination in roles for black actors.

In 1953, Washington was a film casting consultant for Carmen Jones, which starred Dorothy Dandridge, another pioneering Black-American actress.

Washington died of a stroke, the last of several, on June 28, 1994 in Stamford, Connecticut at the age of 90. According to her sister, Isabel, Fredi never had children.

At her death, Washington was survived by her sisters Isabel Washington, Rosebud Smith of Jamaica, Queens; and Gertrude Penna of Orlando, FL; and a brother, Floyd Washington of Hempstead, New York.

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2 days ago
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Change The Mascot Name Washington Redskins: End Racism in Sports

(Source: youtube.com)

3 days ago
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Celebrating the wiping out of #GeneralCuster 138 years ago at the #LittleBigHorn #Native #IndianCountry

"Custer is said to have boasted that he could ride through the entire Sioux Nation with his Seventh Cavalry, and he was half right. He got half-way through." ~Vine Deloria Jr. (1933 - 2005)

"The USA to this day maintains a legal, economic and political oppression on the Sioux Nation based on the doctrine of discovery which is a complete religious-legal fiction enforced by fear, poverty and military-police state.” ~@LastRealIndians

"[T]he understanding of the racial question does not ultimately involve understanding by either blacks or Indians. It involves the white man himself. He must examine his past. He must face the problems he has created within himself and within others. The white man must no longer project his fears and insecurities onto other groups, race, and countries. Before the white man can relate to others he must forego the pleasure of defining them." —Vine Deloria Jr. (1933 – 2005), "Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto"

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3 days ago
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Celebrating Beautiful @Aranesa Turner of Pomo and African heritage. #Multiracial #Biracial #MixedRace #BlackIndians

"I sing for empowerment." ~Aranesa Turner

Aranesa Turner is a member of the Big Valley Band of Pomo Indian. Her mother was born and raised on the Big Valley Rancheria reservation, and her father is Black American. She is believed to the second American Indian to be selected for the main competition of American Idol (Charly Lowry, being the first). 

Aranesa wasn’t born on the reservation, but it kind of stopped at her. Everybody else was born on the reservation: her mother, grandmother, aunty, uncles, and even though she wasn’t raised on the reservation she has always visited as a young girl. 

They’ve always gone to pow wows, always gone to the rez; her great grandma’s house is there, so she has always been connected to her rez. 

"And just seeing reservation life is, you know, pretty much poverty stricken and all the drug abuse and all the alcohol abuse and all that stuff — it really, really has tugged on my heart since I was a little girl. I’ve always had a heart for people, especially my people. In singing, in having the gift of singing, I feel like I have to use it to give back, I have to use it for my people because we’re hungry, we’re starving for positivity; we’re real-life hungry for change. So [being American Indian] definitely, definitely plays a big part in what I do."

Her father who’s Black American actually went double platinum in the ‘90s for his single. He was in a group called D.R.S. and they went double platinum for the single entitled “Gangsta Lean.” … He was a singer. 

"I feel like that’s why I maybe have this natural love for it. It’s definitely genetic, but I also think that it’s a gift. I feel like my influence is my heart. People keep me going. My heart for people — that influences me to keep doing what I’m doing."

Now that Aranesa has been [unfortunately] eliminated from American Idol, we’d like to congratulate her for putting herself out there and for celebrating her heritage. We wish her plenty of success.

The Pomo people are a linguistic branch of American Indian people of Northern California. Their historic territory was on the Pacific Coast between Cleone and Duncans Point, and inland to Clear Lake.

Stay informed about our work. Subscribe to I Love Ancestry eNews: http://eepurl.com/CLJan - Our strength lies in collective action. Join Us NOW!

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3 days ago
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